Indiana University South Bend Black Student Union, Sororities, and Fraternities

Indiana University South Bend Black Student Union, Sororities, and Fraternities

- There is an Afro-American Society listed in the 1970 IUSB Yearbook, The Titan. There is a page devoted to the Afro-American Society - albeit mostly pictures. The heading reads: "Afro-Americans stress black pride". The text reads: "With the goal in mind of stressing Black pride and unity on the IUSB campus, the Afro-American Society came into existence in 1969. The principal contribution of the Society which has been active in the Black movement on campus has been the establishment of a scholarship for Black students." There are three pictures, and there look to be four members of the Society in total: Edward Lark, George McCullough, Richard Hubbard, and Society Chairman Willy Jones.

- Note: 1970 was the first, and one of the only years, that a yearbook was produced on campus.

- In The Student Life Study of IUSB, February 1978 - compiled by IUSB's Division of Student Services, there is a note under the section, "Narrative of Expenses for Student Activities Budget Indiana University at South Bend, 1977 - 1978", various events on campus, including, a Black Culture Week, which "is being planned for February Proposed activities include a dinner lecture, dance troupe, and an art display". Also, there is a lecture that was being planned for the Spring 1978 semester, "Apartheid in South Africa".
- Note: This does not indicate just which clubs and/or campus divisions put on the Black Culture Week.

- IUSB inaugurated a program called the Special Services Program in 1970, which reached out to students of color, along with other groups of students that historically have been excluded from academia. The Special Services Program of 1970 reads:
"The Special Services Program deals in particular with the educationally excluded, the physically handicapped, student s from low income backgrounds and minority groups already enrolled at IUSB. It is designed to help these students remain in college and complete the work required for a degree."
It offered students tutorial services, counseling services for academics, career, and psychological needs, and part-time employment. It was located on Pleasant Street, near campus. Note: several of IUSB's current buildings, at that time, were not built, of course, and many of the neighboring houses were used for IUSB departments and offices.

In a 1971 - 1972 draft describing the Special Services Program, it reads: "Recruiting of culturally different students has been done largely through the conventional techniques. However, the Afro-American Society, a student organization of Black students at Indiana University at South Bend, has taken the initiative of contacting Black students in the area, working within high schools, in order to find those who should be encouraged to continue their education. These individuals have a wide range of contacts with the Black Community at large".

** Note: In an IUSB announcement concerning the IUSB Special Services Program of December 21, 1972, it appears that the Afro-American Society had changed its name to the Black Student Union. Further, IUSB hired a Director of the program, Micael S. Klaybor. It had, by this time, inaugurated a learning resource center at 1916 Mishawaka Avenue, "…on the Northern perimeter of the IUSB campus, which is supplied with textbooks, typewriters, tape recorders, reading machines, books and magazines..."
"An IUSB freshman, Willie Hubbard, serves as Klaybor's administrative assistant to coordinate Special Services programs with those of the Black Student Union, an IUSB student organization. A dozen students work for Special Services as tutors"...

- Note: from the Chancellor Lester Wolfson Collection, Student Services section, Student Services Program 1970 - 1972 folder.

- In the Student Association's Club Directory of 1983 - 1984, the Black Student Union is listed, to directly quote the text of the mission statement:

Indiana University South Bend
Black Student Union
The Black Student Union is an organization whose primary concern and function is to assist the student in his/her educational pursuits. Realizing that students have needs outside the educational institutions, the Black Student Union attempts to provide supportive services, which may or may not be directly educationally related, yet equally important to the educational experience. The Black Student Union also attempts to raise the level of consciousness of the student body as well as the university administrators in the areas of black awareness. The Black Student Union also serves as a liason between the community and the University.
Goals and Objectives
The following is a list of the goals and objectives for the coming year:

  1. Assisting the university in serving the academic and para-academic needs of the student body;
  2. Providing tutorial and guidance services to students, in an effort to achieve high academic standards that are consistent with the university objectives;
  3. Promoting and advancing the level of cultural awareness of the student body; and
  4. Assisting the students in preparing for and obtaining their niche in the society at large.
Note: This fact sheet made with the aid of IUPUI's B.S.U. - This is found in the Student Associations Collection.

- In a 1985 program of IUSB campus-wide celebration of the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday, members of the Black Student Union presented a theatrical skit as well as a dance number. There are subsequent years' materials of IUSB celebrations of the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday in the same collection (From the Student Associations Collection).

- The Student Associations Collection holds announcements of many of the Black Student Union's sponsored events over the years, including career fairs, lectures, banquet dinners, dances and balls (the Red and White Ball was held in 1990 and 1991, and a masquerade ball was held in 1993), film series on campus. The collection has the bulk of such materials from the late 1980's and early 1990's.

- The Black Student Union held its first Scholarship Concert in 1990 with a gospel concert given by IUSB faculty member John Smith in Northside Hall.

- The Black Student Union held a reception "to welcome new and returning minority students on campus" in September 1991. (From the Student Associations Collection).

In a 1992 directory of IUSB Student Organizations, the President of the Black Student Union is listed as Brian Jones, Vice-President is Matthew Miller, and faculty advisor is Debbie Kingsberry. (From the Student Associations Collection).

Indiana University South Bend Sororities:

- Delta Sigma Nu Sorority was on campus in 1970, and have a two page spread in the IUSB Yearbook of that year, The Titan. The header on this reads: "Students on the go: Girls of AEA". The text reads: "Delta Sigma Nu sisters set a precedent when, this school year, they became the first regional campus sorority to pledge a national fraternity, Alpha Xi Delta. The sisters are now members of the Zeta Delta Chapter of the fraternity. They are involved in both service and social activities. The sorority has contributed time and energy at the St. Joseph County Home and with the Urban Youth League. They have also sponsored teas and dances throughout the school year. Any girl attending IUSB full time and holding at least a 2.0 average is eligible." There are three pictures, one of the entire campus chapter, one of the sorority's officers, and one of IUSB Chancellor Lester Wolfson buying a copy of The Titan Yearbook from "Zeta Delta salesgirls". It appears that Delta Sigma Nu changed names to: the Alpha Xi Delta Sorority. This is an educated guess, just as Zeta Delta seems to be affiliated with Alpha Xi Delta sorority. Alpha Xi Delta sorority was on campus in 1978 (as per The Student Life Study of IUSB, February 1978 - compiled by IUSB's Division of Student Services). Alpha Xi Delta is a national sorority (see their website at: http://www.alphaxidelta.org/). As the Student Life Study of IUSB of 1978 states: "Philanthropically, the local chapter has sponsored such projects as preparing Thanksgiving baskets for needy families and collecting funds for the Heart Association and Muscular Dystrophy. Socially, there are dances, parties, hayrides, bowling,, and skating. Alpha Xi Delta provides an excellent opportunity to get together with other girls and make lasting friendships".

- From: Student Life Study of IUSB of February 1978, "Academic Related and/or Non Supported Student Organizations", in the IUSB Student Services Collection.

- Alpha Xi Delta has a two-page photo spread in both the 1970 and the 1971 IUSB Yearbook, The Titan. Unfortunately there is no accompanying text to describe the sorority in any way. The 1970 yearbook features the sorority sisters engaging in a cleaning campaign, some collective mailing (?) campaigns, and playing foosball and drinking beer. In the 1971 yearbook, one of the two photos, they appear to be standing in front of a residential house with an address of "711" - might this be on one of the blocks adjoining the campus?

- There was an Alpha Lambda Sorority on campus (perhaps this is a part of the national sorority, headquartered in Indianapolis, Alpha Lambda Alpha - see: http://www.alphasigmaalpha.org/). The Alpha Lambda sorority has a two-page photo spread in both the 1970 IUSB Yearbook, The Titan. The photos include the entire chapter's members, the sorority's pledging members, and three pictures of activities of the sorority outside. The heading reads: "Alpha Lambda 1970". The text reads: "Under the capable leadership of president Chris Bethe, the twenty-two girls of Alpha Lambda work together to provide service for their school and their community. Whether in the aisles of the IUSB auditorium at IU productions or in the bleachers of a gymnasium at IUSB basketball games, the Alpha Lambda's can be found assisting patrons of the arts and sports fans to their seats. As special projects in the local community, the girls prepared a Thanksgiving food basket for a needy family in the area, and also planned a Christmas caroling program to be given in a local nursing home and at the Northern Indiana Children's Hospital. To be eligible for membership in this local service sorority, a girl must be in good standing with the university and have a willingness to serve her school and her community. The other officers of the Alpha Lambda sorority are Debbie Wagoner, vice-president; Jacki Cholaj, secretary; and Barb Micicinski, treasurer."

- Note: in a 1992 directory of IUSB Student Organizations, Alpha Sigma Lambda is listed as "inactive". (From the Student Associations Collection)

- There appears to have been a Theta Tau Delta Sorority on campus (See: http://www.deltathetatau.org/ - might this be a match? This is Delta Theta Tau, which was begun in Muncie, Indiana - there does not appear to be an organization named Theta Tau Delta). This chapter has a four page photograph spread in the 1970 IUSB Yearbook, The Titan. The titles read: "Theta is where the action is", and "Theta's mix - Scotch and Soda'". The text reads: "The Theta Tau Delta Sorority (better known as the Theta's) has been active on the South Bend Campus since 1966. The Theta's function is not only as a social group but as a service organization as well. The sisters entertained children from the Sunshine House with a Thanksgiving party held at the Northern Indiana Children's Hospital. Throughout the year, they have sponsored activities for the support of their service theme, "Aid for the Mentally Retarded." The sorority also held an inter-sorority tea for the promotion of better inter-sorority relations. An important part of any college social calendar is "The Dance". The Second Annual Theta Tau Delta Ball, "Scotch and Soda", took place on the evening of February 28. The Ball was held at the Erskine Park Clubhouse. Music for the semi-formal affair was provided by the Brand X. The sisters also held a Mother and Daughter Banquet which has also become part of their annual program of events." Note: Brand X was a men's wear boutique on Miami Avenue in South Bend - they advertise in this yearbook also. Photos include pictures from the dance, active members, pledging members, officers, and the sorority sisters socializing. The sorority has a two page photo spread in the 1971 yearbook, this time with no accompanying text to inform about the organization itself.

- The sorority appears to have had a house, as seen in an announcement of their Children's Film Series (circa 1980's) at 3102 East Jefferson Boulevard. (From the Student Organizations Collections).

- There was an Omega Epsilon Phi Sorority, as listed in the Student Association's Club Directory of 1983 - 1984. There does not seem to be any information currently about a national or international organization of this name.
The text of the sorority's description, in part, reads:
"Omega Epsilon Phi Sorority is one of the newest organizations at IUSB. The sorority was started in May of 1983, and is now one of the major clubs at IUSB. ...
...the sorority expands your social life through parties, school activities, and community functions...
Omega Epsilon Phi is also a community service sorority, working and offering service to the public of the South Bend/Mishawaka area. Feel free to call us at..., or visit us at 1904 Marine St. in South Bend." Further, there is an announcement from the sorority of 1984 offering fellow students a weekend babysitting service at the sorority house.
- This is found in the Student Associations Collection.

- Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority is the newest addition to the sororities on the IU South Bend campus. It was established in 2002. It is a largely African American sorority that is now international in scope, but has its roots in Indiana (it was founded in 1922 at Indianapolis' Butler University).

The statement of the IU South Bend chapter of Sigma Gamma Rho follows: We are proud member of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc., an "Illustrious" sisterhood.

Iota Xi Sigma Alumnae Chapter was chartered on November 23, 2002 in South Bend, Indiana. The charter members are Kathy Bingham, Kendra Clayton, Teri Ivory, Tracy Robison, Gwen Thompson, and Tonya Spears-Willis.

We are dedicated to serving our local community. We work diligently to uplift and motivate all people and provide opportunities of growth and development to those we serve through our motto, "Greater Service, Greater Progress."

Indiana University South Bend Fraternities:

- Sigma Pi Fraternity was on campus in 1978 (as per The Student Life Study of IUSB, February 1978 - compiled by IUSB's Division of Student Services). Sigma Pi is a national fraternity (see their website at: http://www.sigmapi.org/). As the Student Life Study of IUSB of 1978 states: "Sigma Pi is the only national fraternity in South Bend. Although scholarship is the fraternity's most important goal, a broad range of activities are available, including parties, a varied athletic program, and a "Little Sisters" organization. Dates and times for rush functions are posted during the first week of classes."
- From: Student Life Study of IUSB of February 1978, "Academic Related and/or Non Supported Student Organizations", in the IUSB Student Services Collection.

- There appears to have been a Sigma Phi Fraternity on campus, which does not seem to have very much information available as to their national/international status (see: https://www.sigmaphi.org/index.cfm). Might this be the Sigma Pi listed above? This chapter has a photograph in the 1971 IUSB Yearbook, The Titan. As with the other photographs of fraternities and the sororities, there is no accompanying text to inform about the organization itself.

- There was a Sigma Pi Fraternity on campus - this appears to be different than the Sigma Phi Fraternity above, but it is not absolutely clear. Sigma Pi was listed in the Student Association's Club Directory of 1983 - 1984. Information on the national organization can be found here: http://www.sigmapi.org/. Text of the description of the organization in part, reads:
"Sigma Phi Fraternity is today, more than ever before, an integral part of the college environment. Sigma Pi is involved in nearly every aspect of the college experience. At IUSB, it provides a college atmosphere, which many students of this commuter campus will miss... Stop in our Thursday night Happy Hours..."
- They had a fraternity house at 515 West Marion Street in South Bend.

- This is found in the Student Associations Collection. Note: As per a reference request from the Director of Greek Life at Towson University (in Maryland, via phone and then subsequently by e-mail - See Reference Requests of May 2007):

The Delta-Tau Chapter of Sigma Pi Fraternity was founded at Indiana University South Bend on May 16, 1971. Delta-Tau Chapter is the outgrowth of Phi Delta, which was a local fraternity founded at IUSB in 1970. Sigma Pi was the first NIC fraternity on campus.

- There appears to have been a Sigma Rho Fraternity on campus, which, as with the Sigma Phi fraternity above, does not seem to have very much information available as to their national/international status (see: https://www.sigmaphi.org/ - as far as this seems to indicate, they currently have two chapters at two separate universities). This chapter has a four-page photograph spread in the 1970 IUSB Yearbook, The Titan. The headings read: "Meet the Men of Sigma Rho", and "ER's Annual delight Mini-Skirt Dance". The text reads: "Officers in Sigma Rho Fraternity include Jeff Atwell, President; Brent Memmerlein, Vice-President; Tom Szymarek, Treasurer; and Bill Schori, Secretary. Sigma Rho began in February of 1967 and purchased its house in the Summer of 1968. At present the fraternity includes 24 active and three affiliate members. Sigma Rho involves itself in many local area and fraternal projects during the year." The photos include a house, presumably the fraternity house, which is not marked as to address, the fraternity's members, its officers, its pledges, as well as the fraternity brothers playing basketball, cleaning the inside of their house, their "Mini-Skirt Dance", and a table of small children engaging in a craft project - is this a fraternity service project? The fraternity also has a photograph in the 1971 IUSB Yearbook, but this time without accompanying text.

- There appears to have been an Alpha Delta Omega Fraternity on campus, which, as with the Sigma Phi and Sigma Rho fraternities above, does not seem to have very much information available as to their national/international status (see: This chapter has a four page spread in the 1970 IUSB Yearbook, The Titan. The headings read: "ADO is moving ahead...", and "As IUSB's Largest Frat, ADO Swings". These pages are mostly photographs, featuring basketball games (at the South Bend YMCA gymnasium?), a dance, and parties with people socializing. There are also pictures of the "Actives", presumably active members; "Pledges", presumably hopeful members; and the fraternity's officers. The text reads, "ADO, a growing fraternity with state-wide membership and plans of becoming a national organization, presently has 77 members, 35 of whom are active. Officers include President Gene Dykstra; Vice-President Anthony George; Secretary Scott Frisk; Pledge Trainers Jim Bush, Pat Call, and Phil Hoose; and Sergeant-at-Arms Terry Kalamaras. During the Fall of 1969, ADO made the purchase of a house which now serves as its headquarters. The brothers sponsor Spring and Fall rushes in an attempt to increase fraternity membership. ADO is a fraternity on the move". It also has a photograph in the 1971 IUSB Yearbook, The Titan, this time with no accompanying text.

NOTE on both the Alpha Delta Omega and Sigma Rho fraternities above: in an undated letter from the Chancellor Lester Wolfson Collection (Box 13, File 16: "Recourse" - the student newspaper of IUSB's Chapter of the Students for a Democratic Society), these two fraternities led a counter-protest to the S.D.S. rally in Pottawomi Park. They wanted to "...show the public that the vast majority of young Americans are against the S.D.S. and its policies." This ought to be circa 1969 to 1971, as this seems to be when there was a S.D.S. chapter on campus (as discerned by The Recourse's years in Wolfson's Collection).

-- There appears to have been an Phi Delta Fraternity on campus, which, as with the Sigma Phi, Sigma Rho, and Alpha Delta Omega fraternities above, does not seem to have very much information available as to their national/international status (see: http://www.apd.org/ - might this be a match? There does not seem to be any Phi Delta organizations in existence - there are other "Phi Delta"s that have other Greek words in their names - as with this one - Alpha, Phi, Psi, etc.)
This chapter has a photograph in the 1971 IUSB Yearbook, The Titan. As with the other photographs of fraternities and the sororities, there is no accompanying text to inform about the organization itself.

Last Reviewed: 11/2016